The Staggering Cost of Undiagnosed Obstructed Sleep Apnea

According to a recent article posted by News Medical, a report reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) released a new analysis, titled “Hidden health crisis costing America billions,” that reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea. A companion report was also released, titled “In an age of constant activity, the solution to improving the nation’s health may lie in helping it sleep better,” which summarizes the results of an online survey completed by patients currently being treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Both reports were commissioned by the AASM and prepared by the global research and consulting firm Frost & Sullivan.

Cost of Obstructed Sleep ApneaOSA is a chronic disease that is rising in prevalence in the U.S. Frost & Sullivan estimates that OSA afflicts 29.4 million American men and women, which represents 12 percent of the U.S. adult population. They also calculated that diagnosing and treating every patient in the U.S. who has sleep apnea would produce an annual economic savings of $100.1 billion.

Treating sleep apnea improves productivity and safety while reducing health care utilization, notes AASM Immediate Past President Dr. Nathaniel Watson. His editorial about the report is published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Frost & Sullivan calculated that the annual economic burden of undiagnosed sleep apnea among U.S. adults is approximately $149.6 billion. The estimated costs include $86.9 billion in lost productivity, $26.2 billion in motor vehicle accidents and $6.5 billion in workplace accidents. Untreated sleep apnea also increases the risk of costly health complications such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and depression. The report estimates that undiagnosed sleep apnea also costs $30 billion annually in increased health care utilization and medication costs related to these comorbid health risks.

To learn more about the Sleep Group Solutions protocol, which bring physicians and dentists together to screen and treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea, check out their live 2-day lectures.

I’d be more than happy to discuss any of your thoughts regarding sleep apnea the next time you are in the office. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding sleep apnea, don’t hesitate to contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence H. Stone, DDS, any time at 215-230-7667.

Image used in this blog is courtesy of the AASM. Blog courtesy of http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/staggering-cost-undiagnosed-osa/

 

 

Obstructive Sleep Apnea – Can You Pass This Simple Test?

STOP-BANG Quetionnaire

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most under-diagnosed and potentially most serious of all medical conditions. If untreated, it can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, and premature death.

By taking this simple test below (the “STOP-BANG” questionnaire) you can determine if you are at risk for OSA. If so, speak with your physician or call us for a referral to a medical sleep specialist. Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

STOP-BANG Questionnaire
To Assess Risk for an Obstructed Sleep Airway (OSA)

  1. Do you Snore loudly (louder than talking or loud enough to be heard through closed doors ?   O Yes O No
  2. Do you often feel Tired, fatigued, or sleepy during daytime?  O Yes O No
  3. Has anyone Observed you stop breathing during your sleep? O Yes O No
  4. Do you have or are you being treated for high blood pressure? O Yes O No
  5. Body Mass Index (BMI) more than 35 (use the formula to calculate your BMI)?
    O Yes O No
    BMIFormula
  6. Age over 50 yr old?  O Yes O No
  7. Neck circumference greater than 40 cm?  O Yes O No
  8. Gender male?  O Yes O No

Scoring: Answering “yes” to three or more of the 8 questions indicates that you are at High Risk for OSA. Answering “yes” to less than three questions indicates that you are at Low Risk for OSA. If you scored in the High Risk for OSA category, a sleep study or an evaluation by a sleep specialist may be warranted.