Microbeads in Toothpaste – What you should know.

The ADA Speaks Out on “Good Morning America”

crestprohealthtoothpaste

I received the following issues alert from the American Dental Association (ADA) which I thought would be useful to you. I am reprinting this important information below.

ABC’s Good Morning America (GMA) contacted the ADA for a segment that aired in September on microbeads (polyethylene) in toothpaste. All of the varieties of Crest ProHealth® toothpaste which have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance contain microbeads.

The ADA provided a press statement to the GMA producer indicating, “According to the American Dental Association, clinically relevant dental health studies do not indicate that the ADA Seal should be removed from toothpastes that contain polyethylene microbeads. Products with the ADA Seal have been independently evaluated for safety and effectiveness by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs.”

Local news stations, including ABC 7 Chicago, have previously reported on microbeads from health and environmental angles. Procter & Gamble (P&G), the manufacturer of Crest ProHealth®, includes information for the public on their website and has indicated they plan to remove microbeads from toothpaste.

According to P&G, “While the ingredient in question is completely safe, approved for use in foods by the FDA and part of an enjoyable brushing experience for millions of consumers with no issues, we understand there is a growing preference for us to remove this ingredient. So we will. Crest will continue to provide consumers with effective and enjoyable products which are designed to their preferences.”

The following are some responses prepared by the ADA on questions regarding microbeads in toothpaste:

  • Microbeads have been in the news lately. You may have heard about it in connection with toothpaste.
  • Microbeads are most often used as scrubbing beads in exfoliating skin care products.
  • The FDA has approved microbeads as a food additive, and small quantities, which appear as colored specks, are in some of Crest’s toothpastes, including Crest Pro Health, which has the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance.
  • According to the ADA, clinically relevant dental health studies do not indicate that the ADA Seal should be removed from toothpastes that contain microbeads.
  • Products with the ADA Seal have been independently evaluated for safety and effectiveness by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs.
  • While there is no clinical evidence that microbeads in toothpaste are harmful to your dental health, Crest is voluntarily withdrawing the ingredient from toothpaste in response to growing consumer preference.

As your dentist, my goal is to help you achieve optimal dental oral health. Whenever you have questions about any dental care product, feel free to contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA with any questions or concerns or to schedule your next visit so we can talk more about this. Remember, brushing two minutes twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and flossing daily are important ways to take care of your dental health.

See you soon!

7 Tips For Treating Dry Mouth

In July I wrote a blog about 15 drugs that can cause dry mouth (Xerostomia).There are actually hundreds of medications that can cause dry mouth, a particularly nasty problem that can cause rampant tooth decay, oral infections, difficulty in chewing and swallowing, and otherwise make people miserable. Xerostomia can also be especially difficult to treat, so I am suggesting a few simple things you can do to help in treating dry mouth to manage this malady.
biotene

  1. Sip water throughout the day.
  2. Suck on ice (but do not chew it!).
  3. Discontinue alcohol (including mouthwashes containing alcohol), caffeine and sodas – all of which can dry out the mouth.
  4. Humidify your sleeping area with a cool mist vaporizer.
  5. Keep your lips lubricated with lanolin or Lansinoh, an over-the counter (OTC) ointment.
  6. Use fluoride supplements to fight decay.
  7. Consider using Biotene (OTC) oral care products including their toothpaste, mouth rinse and mouth moisturizing gel.Taken together, the Biotene products constitute an “enzyme replacement system” which can be very beneficial for dry mouth patients.

I hope these simple suggestions help if you suffer from dry mouth. As always, please contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA with any questions or concerns or to schedule your next visit so we can talk more about this. See you soon!

Mouthwash Ingredients – Why you should avoid those containing CPC

Mourthwash Ingredients Dr. Larry Stone

I’ve known for some time that sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), a detergent found in many toothpastes can contribute to apthous ulcers – those small annoying ulcerations in our mouths that mysteriously affect many of us. What I didn’t know until recently was that cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), the active ingredient in many mouthwashes, i.e. Crest Pro Health, Colgate Total, BreathRx, Scope, Cepacol and Viadent, can interact with SLS to cause staining and sloughing of the buccal mucosa (the inner lining of the cheeks).

Patients often complain of staining and are often at a loss as to why this occurs. Here is just another potential contributing factor in addition to smoking, coffee, tea, etc.

As it happens, Listerine is one of the few mouth rinses that does not contain CPC as one of its mouthwash ingredients, but rather relies on essential oils such as thymol, wintergreen, peppermint and menthol to kill the bacterial plaque responsible for gingivitis.

So now you know! Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

What you need to know about Triclosan

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Recently the news has been abuzz with reports about the purported health consequences of triclosan, an FDA approved antibacterial agent used in some of the Colgate toothpastes for years. I’m sure that Colgate’s’ competitors are having a “field day” with this development! I’ve even seen ads on TV touting products that specifically do not contain triclosan.

In any event, I am including the following letter from Colgate regarding the facts of the controversy and would specifically direct your attention to the arrows below regarding safety. For now at least, I am sticking with Colgate. If my opinion changes I will let you know. As always though, you are free to form your own opinions.

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

Best wishes,

Larry Stone

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8 FACTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT COLGATE TOTAL®
Dear Colleague, Colgate
Every day you make recommendations for your patient’s home care
based on scientific evidence, your professional experience and patient
needs. Here are the facts:
1 Colgate Total® is the toothpaste most recommended and used by
dental professionals in the USA.*
2 Colgate Total helps prevent, treat and reverse gingivitis. It reduces
90% more germs that cause gingivitis than regular toothpaste.**
3 Colgate Total is one of the most extensively tested and
researched toothpastes in the world. Read More >
4 90 clinical studies, over 20 years and 20,000 subjects support
Colgate Total’s safety and efficacy.
5 A 2013 independent systematic review by the Cochrane Oral
Health Group
affirmed the superiority of triclosan/copolymer on
several measures of plaque and gingivitis compared to regular
toothpaste. It also concluded there was no evidence of any harmful
effects. The review included 30 studies of up to 3 years in duration,
between 1990 to 2012, involving 14,835 participants. Read More >
6 Colgate Total is accepted by the ADA and over 40 dental
associations worldwide. Read More >
7 Colgate Total is the only FDA approved toothpaste through the
rigorous new drug application process – the same process used to
review the safety of prescription drugs.
8 Regulatory agencies in the United States, Australia, Canada
and Europe have conducted their own reviews of Colgate Total, and
in every case, have affirmed its safety and effectiveness in
fighting gingivitis.
For more of the science and facts please visit:
See the Science
Safety and Efficacy
Systematic Review
Dr. Barbara Shearer, BDS MDS, PhD
Dr. Barbara Shearer, BDS MDS, PhD
Director, Scientific Affairs
Colgate
*Professional Tracking Study, Ipsos, 2013
**12 hours after brushing. Data on file.
©2014 Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, NY 10022, USA.
This is an advertisement from Colgate-Palmolive Company.
For more information, visit colgateprofessional.com.
Colgate-Palmolive cares about your privacy. To learn more, read our Privacy Policy.
Contact Colgate-Palmolive at: Colgate-Palmolive 300 Park Avenue New York, NY 10022
To contact consumer affairs, click here.

8 Things You Can Do to Prevent Your Kids From Using Chewing Tobacco

ChewTobacco

8 Things You Can Do to Prevent Your Kids From Using Chewing Tobacco

Bill Tuttle was a major league baseball player who lost his battle with oral cancer in 1998 after a five-year struggle with the disease. A good friend and contemporary of Joe Garagiola, Bill endured five surgeries that resulted in his inability to speak or swallow and left him severely disfigured.

As a follow up to an earlier blog about tobacco associated oral cancer among professional athletes, here are 8 steps developed by the Oral Cancer Foundation you can take to discourage your kids from ever starting with “spit tobacco”.

  1.       Talk to them.

Parents who talk to their children are more likely to have a positive effect in influencing their behavior.

  1.       Make Your Feelings Clear

Let children know how you feel about their behavior with respect to tobacco usage.

  1.       Help Children Decode Ads

Many tobacco ads and products appeal to an increasingly younger audience. Help kids understand the truth of these ads.

  1.       Give Them a Reality Check

Let children know that most people don’t use tobacco products, including spit tobacco, and that it’s not the cool thing to do.

  1.       Emphasize Health.

Children are notoriously unconcerned about health. (Remember those days!). Educate them as to the serious health consequences of tobacco use.

  1.       Emphasize Addiction.

Some people feel that nicotine is as addictive as heroin! The advent of e-cigarettes and “vape-pens” only makes the problem worse. The younger children are when they start experimenting with tobacco, the more likely they are to suffer severe consequences.

  1.       Don’t Use Spit Tobacco Yourself.

“Do what I say and not what I do” is not an option here. The same applies to your daily oral hygiene practices.

  1.       Impose Consequences.

Children need to know that there will be consequences for unacceptable behavior, including the use of tobacco products. No exceptions!

 

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

 

 

 

 

10 Athletes Who Fought Oral Cancer

Tony Gwynn #19

1.Tony Gwynn
Recently the baseball world was saddened by the death of Tony Gwynn. only 54 when he lost his battle with oral cancer. Tony inspired fans for 20 years while playing for the Padres. This prompted me to research other athletes who may have had oral cancer and I was shocked by the names I found! Indeed, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation, 115 new individuals will be diagnosed with this insidious disease each day in the United States.

2. Babe Ruth
Born in 1895, Babe, the quintessential baseball player, was only 53 when he lost his life to nasopharyngeal cancer. Like many baseball players the Babe chewed tobacco. In fact he began chewing tobacco when he was 5 years old!

3.Curt Flood
Curt Flood played for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Senators, losing his life to oral cancer on January 20,1997. He was only 49.

4. Brett Butler
Born in 1957, Brett played for the Mets and Dodgers before being diagnosed with his oral cancer. He beat it !

5. Bill Tuttle
Baseball management

6. Hubert Green
One of the most successful professional golfers, Hubie Green was born on December 28, 1946. A smoker, Hubert beat his cancer and was able to return to the game he loves.

7. Jim Thorpe
Perhaps the most famous American athlete of all time, Jim Thorpe died penniless in 1953 from oral cancer.

8. Charles Robert Hamilton, Sr.
Charles “Bobby” Hamilton was a well-respected NASCAR driver who lost his battle with oral cancer in 2007 at the age of 50.

9. Donnie Walsh
Donnie Walsh was an NBA executive who worked with the N.Y. Knicks and Indiana Pacers during the course of his career. He was a smoker who survived cancer of the tongue.

10. Jim Kelly
A Hall of Fame quarterback with the Buffalo Bills, Jim is now battling oral cancer and has had several disfiguring surgeries but is fighting to survive.

In my next blog: How to keep your children away from smokeless tobacco!

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

Photo courtesy of TheBaseballJournal.com

15 Prescription Drugs That Can Lead to Dry Mouth (Xerostomia) – and why you should be worried

pills

Xerostomia (dry mouth), is a serious dental problem affecting millions of people.
Saliva has antibacterial properties and when we don’t have enough of it we can suffer
from increased tooth decay and  gum disease. Additionally,  dry mouth makes it difficult for denture wearers to tolerate their appliances and affects our ability to taste the foods we enjoy.

According to a study by Clinical Research Associates, of the top 20 most prescribed drugs in the U. S. in 2010, the following 15 have been associated  with Xerostomia:

  1. Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen – a narcotic
  2. Lisinopril (Prinivil,Zestril) – an antihypertensive
  3. Simvastatin (Zocor) – an antiperlipidemic to fight cholesterol
  4. Amlodipine (Norvasc) – an antihypertensive
  5. Alprazolam (Xanax) – an anti-anxiety medication
  6. Hydrochlorothiazide – a diuretic
  7. Omeprazole (Prilosec) – an anti-ulcer agent
  8. Atorvastatin calcium (Lipitor)– an antihyperlipidemic to fight cholesterol
  9. Furosemide (Lasix) – a diuretic
  10. Metoprolol Tartrate (Lopressor) – an antihypertensive
  11. Sertraline HCL (Zoloft) – an antidepressant
  12. Metoprolol Succinate (Toprol) – an antihypertensive
  13. Zolpidem (Ambien) – a sedative/hypnotic
  14. Oxycodone/Acetaminophen (Percocet) – a narcotic
  15. Citalopram Hydrobromide (Celexa) – an antidepressant

The average 60-year-old in this country is taking at least three prescription medications daily. If you believe you suffer from drug-induced Xerostomia or just feel like you have a dry mouth in general, ask us about it. There are many treatments available to help with this  potentially serious problem.

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

What is your dental health age?

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I was reminded earlier today of a lesson I learned many years ago from a wonderful mentor I once had, Dr. Norman Schenk, one of my first employers. He taught me that much like our age in years, our age can be measured in dental health as well. For example, you could consider a youth to be someone from birth to let’s say 30, an adult to be someone from the age of 30 to maybe 75, and an elder to be someone over the age of 75. Similarly, you could consider a “dental” youth to be someone with all of their teeth even if there was some decay and gingivitis; an adult someone with some missing teeth and perhaps some decay and periodontal disease but amenable to treatment with small removable partial dentures or dental implant-supported crowns; and an elder, someone with advanced disease and perhaps many missing teeth requiring extensive removable partial dentures, implant supported dentures or complete full dentures.

The point of all this? In dentistry we have the ability to literally reverse the aging process! We can take someone who is either 70 or has the dental health of a 70 year old and with advanced dental treatments and cosmetic dental procedures give them the mouth of a 30 year old. Amazing! Ask us about this the next time you are in the office. The value of an attractive smile is priceless.

I’ve seen it time and again.

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

 

Fluoridated water – why all the fuss?

Fluoridated Water

When I read this morning that the city of Dallas, Texas was considering discontinuing fluoridating its public water supply I couldn’t believe my eyes! But it’s true! The city fathers want to save money ($1.8 million for a 3 year contract) by discontinuing the practice after nearly 50 years. Dallas would be the largest city in the country to do this. Approximately 210 million people in the U.S. receive the benefits of drinking fluoridated water-20 million people in Texas alone!

 So why all the fuss? Several reasons:

  • Firstly, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has stated that fluoridation of public water supplies is one of the top 10 public health advancements in the last century! No one can seriously argue that drinking fluoridated water helps prevent tooth decay by strengthening the enamel of children’s teeth while they are forming.
  • Secondly, the move by the industrial food chain in America to a corn-based and processed food diet has wrought havoc on the decay rate in children in particular. Decay rates that were initially lowered with the help of fluoridation are now climbing again thanks to foods and drinks sweetened with high fructose corn syrup. (As a reference consider reading The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan.)
  • And finally, in the end, the cost of treating dental disease would be much higher than the investment needed to prevent it. In this case an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure!

Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!

 

How’s your flossing technique?

dental floss

I remember the first time I learned how to floss properly. It was while working as an associate many years ago in Southampton with Dr. Norman Schenk, one of my early mentors. He was a great man. Kind to everyone, even under the most trying of circumstances. It was embarrassing because I had already been out of dental school for two years and didn’t know the correct flossing technique. In my defense however, I was never taught how to floss correctly, not even in dental school!

My philosophy today on flossing is really quite simple: You don’t have to floss everyday…only the days you eat! And you don’t have to floss all your teeth…only the ones you want to keep. Don’t waste your time with the rest!

If you’re not sure about what you are doing then please ask us. After all, you know we give “homework” here and we expect you to do it, and properly. So, if you haven’t been shown how, then shame on us. Any questions? Don’t hesitate to contact me or the office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, today to schedule your next appointment and we can talk more about this. See you soon!