How to Eat Candy This Halloween

Trick or Treater with pumpkinWith Halloween fast approaching many of us are starting to think about all that candy! And yes, those dentists among us will again be considering all of the potential dental harm that could result from all that candy. But not to worry! If you have been doing your homework throughout the year – brushing twice a day and flossing all of your teeth once a day – you should not have to worry about the occasional (i.e. Halloween) splurge. Nevertheless, to minimize the possible harm from all those sweets, here are a few tips on how to eat candy:

Chocolate
Chocolate, especially dark chocolate is probably your best option. Dark chocolate has less sugar than milk chocolate, thereby offering fewer carbohydrates to the bacteria that reduce sugar to harmful cavity producing acids. Chocolate also washes off your teeth easier than stickier types of candy.

Sticky and Gummy Candies
These are the worst types of candy to eat. They are harder to remove and stay on the teeth longer, giving the bacteria more time to produce  harmful acids.

Hard Candies
Hard candies are also problematic. They can contribute to tooth fractures if bitten into and also permit sugars to be in contact with the teeth for a longer period of time.

Sour Candies
Sour candies are themselves acidic and if sweetened with sugar produce a double whammy of acids.

Popcorn Balls
Popcorn Balls are sticky, sugary and can be hard. They can get stuck between your teeth as well. A more acceptable snack would be popcorn by itself!

I could go on, but you get the idea! Minimize your exposure to sweets, play it smart and above all, have a great Halloween! If you want to learn more about healthy snacks for Halloween, visit MouthHealthy.org‘s recent article on 7 Tooth-Friendly Halloween Treats.

As always, my staff and I are available to address any concerns you have about any impact of candy or food on your teeth. Don’t hesitate ask us the next time you visit our office Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA, or feel free to contact us at 215-230-7667.

Photo courtesy of MouthHealthy.org

 

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About Laurence H. Stone, D.D.S.

Dr. Larry Stone's love of dentistry, strong skill set and accreditations by national dental associations instill confidence in general and cosmetic dentistry patients alike. Dr. Stone is a 1973 graduate of Temple University Dental School, where he was a member of the Oral Surgery Honor Society. Before opening his Doylestown practice, Dr. Stone served as a Senior Assistant Dental Surgeon with the U.S. Public Health Service. He has also been a Clinical Instructor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and is currently on staff at Doylestown Hospital.