The Staggering Cost of Undiagnosed Obstructed Sleep Apnea

According to a recent article posted by News Medical, a report reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) released a new analysis, titled “Hidden health crisis costing America billions,” that reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea. A companion report was also released, titled “In an age of constant activity, the solution to improving the nation’s health may lie in helping it sleep better,” which summarizes the results of an online survey completed by patients currently being treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Both reports were commissioned by the AASM and prepared by the global research and consulting firm Frost & Sullivan.

Cost of Obstructed Sleep ApneaOSA is a chronic disease that is rising in prevalence in the U.S. Frost & Sullivan estimates that OSA afflicts 29.4 million American men and women, which represents 12 percent of the U.S. adult population. They also calculated that diagnosing and treating every patient in the U.S. who has sleep apnea would produce an annual economic savings of $100.1 billion.

Treating sleep apnea improves productivity and safety while reducing health care utilization, notes AASM Immediate Past President Dr. Nathaniel Watson. His editorial about the report is published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Frost & Sullivan calculated that the annual economic burden of undiagnosed sleep apnea among U.S. adults is approximately $149.6 billion. The estimated costs include $86.9 billion in lost productivity, $26.2 billion in motor vehicle accidents and $6.5 billion in workplace accidents. Untreated sleep apnea also increases the risk of costly health complications such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and depression. The report estimates that undiagnosed sleep apnea also costs $30 billion annually in increased health care utilization and medication costs related to these comorbid health risks.

To learn more about the Sleep Group Solutions protocol, which bring physicians and dentists together to screen and treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea, check out their live 2-day lectures.

I’d be more than happy to discuss any of your thoughts regarding sleep apnea the next time you are in the office. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding sleep apnea, don’t hesitate to contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence H. Stone, DDS, any time at 215-230-7667.

Image used in this blog is courtesy of the AASM. Blog courtesy of http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/staggering-cost-undiagnosed-osa/

 

 

To Floss or Not to Floss? That is the Question!

dental flossRecently the Associated Press (AP) published an article entitled “Medical Benefits of Dental Floss Unproven”. This was a very interesting and well researched piece of journalism. It seems that the research in favor of flossing is not as solid as one would have hoped. This may in part be due to the fact that dental floss has been used in one way or another for over 100 years. It’s not surprising that research criteria were not as strict a century ago as they are today. It’s also disappointing though, that even the more recent studies involving flossing are not as rigorous as modern science requires.

That being said, it will remain my recommendation to continue daily flossing as it is my personal belief that proper use of floss not only prevents periodontal disease (the number one cause of tooth loss in adults), but also helps prevent tooth decay between the teeth. Let’s face it, no matter how well you brush, you can’t get a toothbrush in between your teeth to remove bacterial laden plaque. That I can prove!

I can remember my 10th grade history teacher proving that pigs can fly through the use of logic! Common sense however tells us that this is not the case. I suggest that we apply the same common sense to the question of flossing. For now…at least until additional research is done. After all, floss is cheap enough and only takes a minute or two to do.

Until I’m convinced otherwise, I’ll stand by my current recommendations:

  1. You don’t have to floss every day- just the days you eat!
  2. You don’t have to floss all your teeth- just the ones you want to keep!

I’d be more than happy to discuss any of your thoughts regarding flossing the next time you are in the office. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding flossing, don’t hesitate to contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence H. Stone, DDS, any time at 215-230-7667.