Tooth Sensitivity

tooth_sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is one of the most common complaints we see on a daily basis at the office. There can be many different causes for dental sensitivity including overzealous brushing, using a toothpaste that is too abrasive, unsupervised “whitening”, frequent consumption of acidic beverages (i.e. soda), deficiencies in the structure of the teeth, and so on.

Treatments for sensitive teeth can include using a desensitizing toothpaste, use of prescription strength fluoride toothpastes and rinses and application of any one of a number of desensitizing medicaments in the office.

While sensitivity is not usually a sign of a more serious dental problem, it can be! If you find yourself experiencing this annoying symptom, please bring it to our attention as soon as possible.

Also, we are currently participating in a federally funded National Practitioner Data Bank Research Network Study of sensitivity. If you are having problems with sensitive teeth you may qualify as a compensated subject in this observational study. You will be treated as anyone else with sensitive teeth and will not be subject to any experimental treatments!

You can contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA to discuss any concerns you may have regarding sensitivity and to schedule an appointment.

Polypharmacy – Are you at risk for prescribing cascade with your medications?

Pills_polypharmacy_DrLarryStone

As the population in the United States ages, so does the population of dental patients that are typically seen each day. One of the most noted characteristics of this group is the sheer number of prescription medications they take. The average 65 year old is taking five or more medications for a variety of reasons. One of the most serious side effects of many medications is drug-induced xerostomia (dry mouth), which can be devastating to one’s oral health!  (See my prior blog on Xerostomia.)

Another aspect of this “polypharmacy” is that patients taking five or more drugs are at risk of experiencing “prescribing cascade”, which occurs when unrecognized side effects of an existing drug prompts physicians to prescribe a new drug to then treat these new symptoms! The elderly and persons with disabilities are especially prone to prescribing cascade. The Beers list, developed by an expert panel to assess inappropriate drug prescribing, consists of a list of medications that are particularly prone to adverse effects in the elderly.

Please consult with your personal physician should you have any questions regarding this issue. And please let us know if you are experiencing “dry mouth”. Be sure to ask us at your next visit how you can best treat dry mouth. You can contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA to discuss any concerns you may have and to schedule an appointment.

4 Dental Lessons to Learn From Your Car

Car Maintenance Checklist_Dr. Larry Stone

Now that it’s summertime and our thoughts turn to vacations and road trips, a recent post on the American Dental Association’s website for consumers caught my attention. It discussed how Americans tend to take care of their cars pretty faithfully, and yet, we don’t often perform the same routine maintenance on our teeth.

The following lessons from MouthHealthy.org draw from ways we maintain and preserve our cars to make them dependable. Getting oil changes, stopping for gas and going through the car wash are the things we do without a second thought to keep our car in tip-top shape. The same should be true of our teeth. Prevention is certainly the best medicine when it comes to taking care of the things you depend on most. Be sure you are getting the most mileage out of your mouth by using these strategies in your dental care routine.

Watch What Gets In Your Grill
A grill on a car keeps harmful things from getting under the hood. Think of your own grill, your mouth, as a filter system for your entire body. Everybody’s mouth is full of germs—some good, some bad. The bad ones can cause cavities and gum disease, which can lead to tooth loss. Severe gum disease is also associated with other medical problems, like diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Keep Your Fuel Tank Full
You wouldn’t put just anything in your fuel tank, so be aware of what you’re putting in your mouth. Keep your engine running with a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables.

Practice Preventative Maintenance
Your car won’t get very far without fresh oil and proper tire pressure. Your teeth also need regular care. Daily brushing and flossing are the best ways to keep your mouth healthy.

Get a Tune Up
Taking your car in for a tune up can extend the life of your vehicle and catch small repairs before they turn into big fixes. Regular visits to your dentist and good dental habits can prevent many dental diseases and will keep you smiling for years to come.

Be sure to ask us at your next visit how you can best keep tune up your mouth. You can contact me or the staff at my office, Dr. Laurence Stone in Doylestown, PA to discuss any concerns you may have and to schedule an appointment. We look forward to serving you.